RESOLUTION: INFORM NEW YORK CITY FAMILIES ABOUT STUDENTS’ EDUCATIONAL RIGHTS UNDER STATE LAW

WHEREAS, Few New York City families are aware of students’ educational rights under state law;

WHEREAS, Families and other education stakeholders who are informed about students’ educational rights play more active and empowered roles in advocating for our city’s children;

WHEREAS, The major categories of educational rights that the courts adopted in the Campaign for Fiscal Equity (CFE) case include

• sufficient numbers of qualified teachers, principals, and other personnel;
• suitable and up-to-date curricula, including an expanded platform of programs to help
students who are at risk of academic failure;
• adequate resources for students with disabilities and English-language learners;
• appropriate class sizes;
• sufficient and up-to-date books, supplies, libraries, educational technology, and laboratories;
• a safe and orderly environment; and
• adequate and accessible school buildings.
WHEREAS, Transparency, government accountability, and informed civic participation by those directly affected by any social issue are hallmarks of a healthy, anti-discriminatory democracy; and

WHEREAS, Eliminating educational inequities and educational-rights violations will give our
children and, in turn, our city a better chance for a brighter future, one filled with opportunity; and therefore, be it

RESOLVED, That this body hereby calls upon New York City’s and New York State’s elected and education officials to


1. publish thorough, user-friendly information about students’ educational rights under state
law, using Essential Resources: The Constitutional Requirements for Providing All Students
in New York State the Opportunity for a Sound Basic Education
(http://bit.ly/Essential_Resources) as a template, and organized based on, but not limited to,
the CFE categories; and

2. by September 2017, provide all New York City public school families with a copy of the
resulting educational-rights publication.


Passed Unanimously on May 10, 2017


Resolution to Fill ELL Vacancy

Whereas, a vacancy exists on Community Education Council District 20 for a parent whose child is receiving or has received within the past 2 years English Language Learner (ELL) services; and

Whereas, CEC20 has complied with Chancellor's Regulation D-140, CEC20's bylaws and applicable state law regarding filling of that vacancy; therefore be it

Resolved, that Community Education Council District 20 hereby selects Marianne Qozman to fill the vacant position on Community Education Council District 20 effective December 23, 2016 through June 30, 2017. 

Passed Unanimously on December 23, 2016

Resolution to Fill Parent Member Vacancy
Whereas, a vacancy exists on Community Education Council District 20 for a parent member; and
Whereas, CEC20 has complied with Chancellor's Regulation D-140, CEC20's bylaws and applicable state law regarding filling of that vacancy; therefore be it
Resolved, that Community Education Council District 20 hereby selects Genevieve Mammana to fill the vacant position on Community Education Council District 20 effective December 23, 2016 through June 30, 2017.
Passed Unanimously on December 23, 2016

Resolution: Calling upon Governor Cuomo and the New York State Legislature for a 2 Year, full phase-in, of the Campaign for Fiscal Equity Funding in New York City and across the State on the 10 Year Anniversary of the NYS Court of Appeals ruling.  
Whereas, in 2006 the New York State (NYS) Court of Appeals (the Court) found that the State was violating students’ constitutional rights to a “sound, basic education”;
Whereas, the Court issued an order that led to the 2007 State-wide settlement of the Campaign for Fiscal Equity (CFE) lawsuit.  The settlement resulted in a commitment to provide $5.5 billion in basic classroom operating aid, also known as Foundation Aid;
Whereas, October 10th, 2016 marked the 10 year Anniversary of this crucial court case ruling in favor of the CFE and, a decade later, schools across the State are still owed $3.8 billion, of which, New York City  schools are owed $1.6 Billion;
Whereas, according to a recent report issued by the Alliance for Quality Education entitled “CFE Derailed: The State of our Schools in the Wake of the 2016 State Budget and a Decade after the Campaign for Fiscal Equity”, 30 out of 33 school districts in which the overwhelming student population is Black and Latino, have not received the money owed;
Whereas, students, particularly Black and Latino students and students living in poverty, have been disproportionately affected by the State’s indifference to providing “a sound, basic education” for all and the State has failed to comply with the CFE ruling;
Whereas, schools across the City have had reductions in classroom funding, have been forced to lay off staff and have seen increased class sizes, while being forced to cut arts and music programs and struggle to provide after school programs and advanced placement courses;
Whereas, there is not an achievement gap as much as there is an opportunity gap;                   
Whereas, we affirm that New York State has a constitutional responsibility to provide a “sound, basic education” for all, regardless of race or zip code and must address the opportunity gap;

Therefore, Be it resolved: that New York City Community Education Council District 20 calls on Governor Cuomo and the New York State Legislature for a full two year phase-in of the CFE funds distributed via the Foundation Aid Formula, to begin to address the opportunity gap that has systemically impacted our schools ability to provide a sound basic education for all children in the city of New York.

Passed Unanimously on December 14, 2016


​​​​​​Resolution in Support of Half Day Pre-K Programs
Whereas, Mayor Bill de Blasio's 2013 campaign for mayor committed to creating a free full day Pre-K program for all NYC children; and
Whereas, the NYC Department of Education has launched the Pre-K For All initiative to offer an expansion of free, full day programs; and
Whereas, the Pre-K For All initiative only offers and full day option and a modest number of half day seats; and
Whereas, the decision to severely limit the number of half day seats was made without consultation with the public; and
Whereas, NYC families do not all have identical needs regarding Pre-K; and
Whereas, Pre-K ensures children reap the benefits of early learning; now therefore
Be It Resolved that CEC20 objects to the decision to offer full day Pre-K without parent or community input; and
Be It Resolved that all families should have the choice for full vs half day Pre-K and not have to pay for private school due to not having a choice; and
Be It Resolved that CEC20 supports families' right to choose the best option for their family; and
Therefore, Be It Resolved that CEC20 requests the city to offer both full day and half day programs during the open registration period. 

Passed Unanimously on May 12, 2015

 
Resolution to support our New York City Public Schools against Governor Cuomo’s politically-driven attack on public education       
Whereas, Governor Andrew Cuomo announced his education plan during his State of the State address in January 2015: and
Whereas, Governor Cuomo's plan would punish low-performing schools in high-poverty areas by putting them into receivership; stripping these schools of local control and silencing the voices of parents and educators, which is a blame-and-punish approach to schools that are suffering because of years of neglect and underfunding by the state; and
Whereas, Governor Cuomo’s plan to lift the statewide cap on chapter schools and eliminate geographic limits could lead to a huge increase in the number of charter schools in New York City and the two-tier system that has been created by inequitable co-locations with charters; charters fail to educate the same number of high-needs students as traditional schools, in violation of state law, but the governor wants to reward their bad behavior; and
 Whereas, Governor Cuomo would move high-stakes testing into overdrive by basing 50 percent of a teacher’s evaluation on state test scores, which goes against research showing that using test scores as a primary basis for evaluating teachers is invalid; high-stakes testing wastes our precious school funds and falsely treats a single test taken on one day of the school year as more important than what happens on the other 180 days; and
 Whereas, Governor Cuomo is refusing to meet his constitutional obligation for funding schools, continuing to withhold the more than $2 billion owed to New York City schools under the Campaign for Fiscal Equity case, and instead offering a funding increase half that size, $1.1 billion, for the entire state; he has also made the funding dependent on the adoption of his destructive agenda for public education, which amounts to extortion; and
 Whereas, New York City schools desperately need their fair share of state aid to restore lost programs in art, music and library; to reduce class size and school overcrowding; and to provide necessary supports to students, including an adequate number of guidance counselors, psychologists and social workers in schools; therefore be it
RESOLVED, that the Community Education Council of District 20 strongly opposes the governor’s educational plan as announced in his State of the State address and will send copies of this resolution to the governor and legislators; and be it further
RESOLVED, that the Community Education Council will join in coalition with educators, parents, clergy, civil rights organizations and community activists to make our voices heard and to move our city’s schools forward.   
Unanimously passed February 11, 2015


Resolution in Support of Citywide and District Community Education Council Administrative Assistants Salary Issues
WHEREAS, Community Education Councils and Citywide Education Council members are elected by PTA parent leaders and, except for the Public Advocate and Borough President appointees, are required to be parents; and
WHEREAS, According to NY State Education Law, they have the power and responsibility to promote achievement of educational standards and objectives relating to the instruction
of students; and
WHEREAS, each council shall be responsible for the appointment, supervision, evaluation and discharge of the secretary (term used in the law); and
WHEREAS, AAs have recently made it known that there is a problem with the present salary structure, including cost of living pay raises, salary range and salary caps; and
WHEREAS, AA’s are vital to the councils as versatile jacks-of-all-trades, who perform tasks that include:
Administrative and office support requiring computer proficiency, research abilities and strong communication skills.
Contending with the different personalities and needs of numerous Council members and the public, as well as coordinating CEC workflow, keeping projects on schedule, looking
after the council’s budget, composing reports and correspondence, preparing agendas in advance, arranging meeting facilities and acting as official record keeper, in addition to
preparing minutes of meetings.
Spending many hours speaking to parents - finding out what parents need and want for their children and explaining DOE policies; and
WHEREAS, AAs are key to the Education Councils’ functioning and they could not carry out their duties without their AA’s, who are DOE employees but not civil-service protected or
union-covered and are considered “managerial/confidential.”; and
WHEREAS, Presently the DOE’s arbitrary and unwritten policies require that any AA salary increase be deducted from the Councils’ operating expense budget, which reduces the
amount available for council outreach, supplies and equipment, thereby making councils hesitant to give their AAs a raise, no matter how well deserved; and
WHEREAS, there was a verbal commitment by the NYCDOE to not reduce the budget of future elected councils after a previous councils’ budgets are reduced due to granting the
AA a raise; however this was never set forth as a written policy or regulation; and
WHEREAS, AA’s have not received any DOE cost-of-living pay raises since March of 2009 nor has the salary range been raised since the councils were created; and
WHEREAS, the AA salaries have not kept up with rising inflation and their position’s salary cap has not  increased since 2009; and
WHEREAS, as a result of the past five years of stagnation the salary cap is much less per year than a School Secretary’s and this means that our most experienced AA’s cannot be
rewarded financially for their outstanding skills. It also means that newly hired AA’s will eventually hit that wage ceiling; and
WHEREAS, Council AAs serve as a line of communication between the Department of Education and parents and the community; and therefore now be it
RESOLVED, that the Community Education Council District 20 fully supports the Citywide and District Community Education Councils’ Administrative Assistants’ (AA’s) requests,
which are:
. Granting of a DOE cost-of-living salary increases similar to the percentage-increases
  being currently awarded to union-backed NYC employees.
. Raising the AA salary cap and that any future pay raises given by the CECs to their
  Administrative Assistants not be deducted from the councils’ operating budget.
. Paying an appropriate salary;
and be it further
RESOLVED, that CEC20 supports the establishment of transparent written policies regarding the AA salaries and their effect on the Council’s operating budgets; and be it further
RESOLVED, that CEC20 supports a timely resolution to the AA salary issues so that Citywide and District Education Councils will be able to keep well qualified and experienced
AA’s to assist them in fulfilling their responsibilities to all the students and their families.

Passed Unanimously on December 3, 2014


Resolution For Rezoning of PS 112 and PS176
Zoning Line Proposal Submission Presented to CEC 20 September 17, 2014
1. Goals of the proposal: The Office of District Planning, the Community Superintendent, and  
the Office of Student Enrollment propose zoning changes for the elementary school zones of P.S. 112 and P.S. 176 in District 20 in order to:
a. Account for the new capacity of building K768, on 7301 15th Avenue, slated to open  for the 2015-2016 school year.
b. Alleviate overcrowding at P.S. 112.
c. Alleviate overcrowding and reduce need to cap and overflow at P.S. 176.
2. Schools affected by the proposal: P.S. 112 and P.S. 176.
3. Effective date for initial implementation: This plan is being implemented for the 2015-2016 school year.
4. Projected number of students in each zone to be moved between all affected schools:
a. In the first year of implementation:

        School                 Current Zone Size    Proposed Zone Size
P.S. 112 Lefferts Park                 100                125-135
P.S. 176 Ovington                      226                 190-200

A complete description of all zone line changes:
a. The addresses contained in the following area would be in the new P.S. 112 zone:
- Begin at the corner of 15th Avenue and 63rd Street, then
- East on 63rd Street, then
- South on 16th Avenue, then
- East on 67th Street, then
- South on 17th Avenue, then
- West on 76th Street, then
- North on 14th Avenue (including both sides of 14th Avenue starting at Bay Ridge Parkway), then
- East 64th Street, then
- North on 15th Avenue to 63rd Street (point of origin)
b. The addresses contained in the following area would be in the new P.S. 176 zone:
- Begin at the corner of 12th Avenue and 62nd Street, then
- East on 62nd Street, then
- South on New Utrecht Avenue, then
- West 64th Street, then
- South on 14th Avenue (not including addresses on 14th Avenue), then
- West on Bay Ridge Parkway, then
- South on 13th Avenue, then
- West on 77th Street, then
- North on 12th Avenue, then
- West on 73rd Street, then
- North on 10th Avenue, then
- East on 67th Street (not including address on 67th Street), then
- North on 12th Avenue to 62nd Street (point of origin)

A statement of how students will be admitted to the affected schools: The proposed changes would impact only incoming kindergarten students or students that are new to the system in 2015-2016. All currently enrolled students may remain in their school. Children whose verified siblings are enrolled in a school impacted by a rezoning plan adopted by the CEC will maintain zoned sibling priority to that impacted school. Students will be enrolled in New York City elementary schools by the following priority:
1. Zoned students whose verified siblings are pre-registered or enrolled at the time of application submission and will be enrolled in grades K-5 in the school at the start of the following school year
2. Zoned students other than those in (1) above applying to the zoned school
3. Students whose verified siblings are pre-registered or enrolled at the time of application submission and will be enrolled in grades K-5 in the school at the start of the following school year who are not zoned to the school, a. Within District first, then b. Out of District
4. Students currently attending the school’s pre-kindergarten program who reside outside the school’s zone, without a sibling who will be in grades K-5 at the school in the following school year, a. Within District first, then b. Out of District
5. Students other than those in (3a) and (4a) above who are residents of that district
6. Students other than those in (3b) and (4b) who are residents of another district
The need for bus service and public transportation: The Office of

Submitted on this date, the 8th day of October 2014 by:

Community Education Council District 20 Resolution passed unanimously.



Resolution in Support of Free and Healthy School Lunch for All NYC Public School Students
WHEREAS, federal law allows New York City to make healthy school lunches universally free for every public school student; and
WHEREAS, New York City is not taking advantage of the great opportunity in making healthy school lunches universally free for every public school student; and
WHEREAS, the need for universally free school lunches is clear; and
WHEREAS, one in every four New York City children lives in a home that lacks enough food; and
WHEREAS, the consequences of childhood hunger are dire: hunger negatively impacts children’s learning and health; and
WHEREAS, school meals are a critical tool in the fight against hunger, but, because of the way the program is currently administered, only about 50% of NYC children eligible for free or reduced-price lunch eat it; and
WHEREAS, in 2013, 250,000 out of 780,000 students eligible for free or reduced price meals did not participate in the subsidized school lunch program. Many more students are above income eligibility for free or reduced priced lunch, yet are in families that are struggling to makes ends meet. Additionally, currently, 81% of elementary school students eat school lunch; it drops to 61% in middle school; and 38% in high school; and
WHEREAS, hundreds of thousands of students in New York City public schools do not participate in federally funded school lunch due to the programs’ poverty stigma. Many of these students, especially as they get older, go without eating school lunch for fear of being labeled poor by their peers, with long-lasting health and educational consequences. If more students participated, more nutritious choices could be offered, and the stigma would be eliminated. An astonishing 68 percent of New York City’s 1.1 million public school children have family incomes low enough to be eligible for free school lunch (below $25,000 for a household of three). Seventy five percent have incomes that qualify them for either free or reduced priced meals; and
WHEREAS, some income-eligible children are not enrolled in the free or reduced-price lunch program because their parents do not submit the paperwork. Many of these parents are concerned about sharing personal financial information, or do not know about the program; and
WHEREAS, making lunch universally free to all students eliminates all of these barriers and ensures all New York City public school children have access to a healthy lunch; and
WHEREAS, students must be well-nourished to learn; and
WHEREAS, starting in September, the city will spend an additional $6.25 million a year so that all 177,000 students in the sixth through eighth grades will qualify for free breakfast and lunch without requiring parents to certify that their income is 130 percent of the $30,615 poverty level for a family of four; and
WHEREAS, Chancellor Fariña indicated that free lunches will only be offered to the stand alone middle school students; and
WHEREAS, by expanding the program, advocates seek to eliminate the shame and embarrassment that keep many children who qualify for the free lunches from receiving them; and
WHEREAS, Community Education Council District 20 believes that New York City should take advantage of all the federal options available to provide free meals, and that the city should make the small investment needed so that no student has to pay for a meal; and
BE IT RESOLVED that Community Education Council District 20 wants to ensure that more children eat healthy school meals by making them free for all, regardless of income; and
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that Community Education Council District 20 calls upon the Mayor and the Governor  to make school lunch free for all students irrespective of the income levels of their parents.   

Passed Unanimously on October 8, 2014


Resolution Opposing Provisions in the NY State Budget for 2014-2015 Requiring the Department of Education Provide Space at Public Expense of Charter Schools

WHEREAS Charter Schools in New York City frequently displace public school students from existing school facilities and create overcrowded conditions; and
WHEREAS Charter Schools in New York City have been shown by the City's Independent Budget Office to receive more public funding per pupil than public schools; and
WHEREAS Charter Schools in New York City have spent over 5 million dollars in fees to public relations and advertising firms in their campaign to demand public space; and
WHEREAS Charter Schoosl in New York City receive backing from wealthy investors who benefit from federal tax credits valued at millions of dollars under the Federal New Markets program; and
WHEREAS Charter Schools have resources and the means to find their own facilities outside of the Department of Education's building inventory;
WHEREAS the New York State Budget for 2014-2015 requires that New York City's Department of Education provide space at no cost to Charter Schools, thereby severely curtailing local control of city schools and placing public school students at a distinct and unfair disadvantage; and
THEREFORE, be it resolved that Community Education Council 20 is opposed to these provisions;
THEREFORE, be it resolved that Community Education Council 20 hereby calls upon the Senate to introduce new legislation rescinding the provisions requiring the Department of Education to provide free space to Charter Schools, thereby restoring local control of city schools; and
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that Community Education Council 20 hereby calls upon Govenor Cuomo to allow the Mayor to oversee the usage of NYC public school space in accordance with the State Education Law of mayoral control. 

Passed Unanimously on April 9. 2014 


Resolution Opposing the Authorization of Coney Island Preparatory Charter School Co-locating in I.S. 281 in District 21
WHEREAS, there is an application for a charter school in District 21 submitted by Coney Island Preparatory Charter School, currently under review by the DOE; and
WHEREAS, the application may include a public school building as a potential site for this charter in District 21, named I.S.281 Joseph B. Cavallaro; and
WHEREAS, more than half of the I.S. 281 zone is from District 20's elementary schools; and
WHEREAS, District 20 is one of the most overcrowded districts in the city and desperately is in need of more middle school seats; and
WHEREAS, District 20 has opened 5 new elementary schools in recent years to help relieve the overcrowding; and
WHEREAS, the space in I.S. 281 is needed to help provide seats to help relieve the overcrowding in the District 20 junior high schools; and
WHEREAS, the space in I.S. 281 is needed to provide seats for the soon to be junior high school students from our new District 20 elementary schools.

Therefore, be it resolved, that Community Education Council District 20 opposes the authorization of Coney Island Preparatory Charter School or any other charter school to co-locate in I.S. 281; and

Therefore, be it resolved, that Community Education Council District 20 calls upon the New York City Department of Education to provide seats in I.S. 281 to meet the continuing growing demands of District 20's middle school enrollment; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that Community Education Council District 20 hereby calls upon the New York City Department of Education, the Panel on Education Policy, and the Chancellor of the New York City Schools to REJECT any request by Coney Island Preparatory Charter and any other charter school to be co-located in I.S. 281 in District 21.

Passed Unanimously on October 9, 2013


Resolution Opposing the Authorization of Success Academy Charter School Co-locating in I.S.96 in District 21
WHEREAS, there is an application for a charter school in District 21 submitted by Success Academy Charter Schools, currently under review by the SUNY Charter Institute; and 
WHEREAS, the application may include a public school building as a potential site for this charter in District 21, namely I.S. 96 Seth Low;  and
WHEREAS, more than half of the I.S. 96 zone is from District 20’s elementary schools; and
WHEREAS, District 20 is one of the most overcrowded districts in the city and desperately is in need of more middle school seats; and
WHEREAS, District 20 has opened 5 new elementary schools in recent years to help relieve the overcrowding; and 
WHEREAS, the space in I.S. 96 is needed to help provide seats to help relieve the  
overcrowding in the District 20 junior high schools; and
WHEREAS, the space in I.S. 96 is needed to provide seats for the soon to be junior high school students from our new District 20 elementary schools; and
Therefore, be it resolved, that Community Education Council District 20 opposes the 
authorization of Success Academy Charter school or any other charter school to co-locate in I.S. 96; and
Therefore, be it resolved, that Community Education Council District 20 calls upon the New York City Department of Education to provide seats in I.S. 96 to meet the continuing growing demands of District 20’s middle school enrollment: and
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that Community Education Council District 20 hereby calls upon the New York City Department of Education, the Panel on Education Policy, the Chancellor of the New York City Schools and SUNY Charter Institute to REJECT any request by Success Academy and any other charter school to be co-located in I.S. 96 in District 21.

Passed Unanimously on August 14, 2013


Need to Protect Student Privacy Resolution
Whereas, New York State and NYC Department of Education have agreed to share confidential student and teacher data with a Gates-funded corporation called inBloom Inc.; and
Whereas, this confidential data will include children's personally identifiable information, including name, address, grades, test scores, disciplinary records, attendance, race, ethnicity, economic status, disabilities, health conditions and other highly sensitive information; and
Whereas this information is to be stored in an electronic "data store" built by Wireless Generation, a subsidiary of Rupert Murdoch's News Corporation, which has been found to have illegally violated privacy in Great Britain and in the US; and
Whereas this information is to be placed on a data cloud managed by Amazon.com, and in a recent survey, 86% of technology professionals said they did not trust clouds to hold their organization's more sensitive data; and
Whereas inBloom Inc. has already stated that it "cannot guarantee the security of the information stored...or that the information will not be intercepted when it is being transmitted."; and
Whereas inBloom Inc. intends to make this highly confidential data available to commercial vendors to help them develop and market their "learning products"; and
Whereas: all this is happening without parental notification or consent.
Whereas: Assembly Member O'Donnell has introduced a bill, A6059, that would require parental notification and consent before any confidential, personally identifiable student data is disclosed to third party vendors;
Therefore Be It Resolved that NYS Education Department & NYC DOE should immediately be obligated to:
1. Notify parents of these impending disclosures and provide them with the right to consent before their child's information is shared;
2. Hold public hearings to explain the point of these disclosures, and hear the concerns of parents & privacy experts about how this plan risks children's privacy, security and safety;
3. Explain how families can obtain relief if their children are harmed by the improper use or accidental release of this information, including who will be held financially responsible;
4. Pledge that the privacy rights of public school children and their families will be respected over the interests of the Gates Foundation, inBloom Inc., News Corp, or any other company or organization.
Therefore Be It Further Resolved that NYS Education Department & NYC DOE remove all personal identifying information, including but not limited to name, address, OSIS number, social security number, and parent name, from data records shared with organizations outside the Department of Education, except in situations that are directly related to the individual child and where the Department of Education has secured the parent or guardian's permission, in writing, for said sharing of information.
Therefore Be It Further Resolved that we urge our state and local elected representatives to help us protect our children's privacy and to ensure that parents are provided with full notification and the right to consent before any disclosures occur.             

Passed Unanimously on April 10, 2013


Contracts for Excellence Resolution
Whereas New York City has the highest class sizes by far in New York State;
Whereas class size reduction is one of only a few education reforms proven to increase student learning, according to the Institute of Education Sciences, the research arm of the US Department of Education;
Whereas in the Campaign for Fiscal Equity lawsuit, the state’s highest court said that NYC students were deprived of their constitutional right to an adequate education because of excessive class sizes;
Whereas reducing class size is the top priority of parents each year according to DOE’s Learning Environment Surveys, and 86% of NYC principals say they are unable to provide a quality education because of overly large classes;
Whereas NYS passed a law in April 2007, called the Contracts for Excellence (C4E) , which provided NYC with extra state funding in return for a promise to reduce class size in all grades;
Whereas NYC submitted a plan that was approved by NYSED in Nov. 2007, calling for annual reductions in class size with the goal of achieving class sizes no larger than 20 students on average in grades K-3, 23 students in grades 4-8, and 25 in core high school classes by the year 2011-2012;
Whereas citywide and in this school district, class sizes have risen substantially since then, instead of decreasing, and are now the largest in the early grades K-3 in 14 years;
Whereas the DOE never allocated any of the C4E funds centrally towards the goal of reducing class size;
Whereas since 2007, DOE has cut school budgets 14%, contradicting the prohibition in the C4E law against supplanting;
Whereas in 2010, DOE eliminated Early grade class size funding, despite a promise in its C4E plan;
Whereas in 2011, DOE decided to stop capping class sizes in 1st-3rd grades at 28, leading to tripling of class sizes 30 or more in these grades;
Whereas in 2012, DOE instructed principals to accommodate special needs students up to contractual class size maximum levels;
Whereas, with class sizes up to 32 in elementary and middle schools and up to 34 in high schools, such large classes do not provide the individual attention that either general education or special education students need and deserve;
Whereas DOE has never aligned either its school utilization formula or its capital plan to the goals in its  class size plan, the latter as specifically required by state law;
Whereas instead of using available space to reduce class size in school buildings, DOE has forced co-locations instead;
Whereas the NYS Education Department has done nothing to ensure that NYC complies with its legal obligations to reduce class size;
Whereas this year, NYC DOE posted its C4E plan for the current (2012-2013) school year in February, and is holding hearings in February and March, long after most of the funding has been allocated and spent, making a mockery of the public process and feedback required by the law;
Whereas the DOE has failed to schedule borough hearings, as the law also specified;
Whereas last year’s NYC state-approved C4E plan has still not been posted or disclosed, making it unclear as to its legal status;
Be it resolved that SED should require the city to hold borough hearings in addition to CEC hearings, as required by law;
Be it resolved that the state should from this year on require that the DOE hold hearings much earlier, in the spring and early summer, so that public feedback can be obtained before the C4E funds are already allocated and spent;
Be it resolved that the NYS Education Department should require NYC use all available C4E funds to reduce class size;
Be it resolved that the NYSED should require DOE to restore its early grade class size funding program, as it promised to do in its C4E plan;
Be it resolved that at the very least, NYSED should require DOE to cap class sizes in 1st-3rd grade at 28, as was done before 2011;
Be it resolved that NYSED should forbid DOE to demand that inclusion and general education class sizes increase to the contractual maximum, in order to accommodate special needs students;.
Be it resolved that NYSED should require DOE to align its “Blue Book” formula and capital plan to the goals in its C4E class size plan, asrequired by state law.
Be it resolved that NYSED should forbid DOE to create any more co-locations unless class sizes are reduced to their C4E goals in the existing public schools in the building.
Be it resolved that our local and state elected officials will join with us in urging that the state hold NYC DOE responsible to comply with its legal and moral obligations to provide smaller classes for all public schoolchildren.

Passed Unanimously on March 20, 2013


Zoning Proposal
Purpose: To create a zone for PS/IS30 opening in September 2013
Schools affected: PS69, PS105, PS127, PS170, PS176, IS30 & IS259

Proposal by Portfolio 10/10/12 CEC Meeting:

 
Resolution District 20 Middle School Rezoning Proposal 2nd REVISION  
Street Boundary Description for Impacted Schools Proposal Submitted October 10, 2012

The Office of Portfolio Management, the Community Superintendent, and the Office of Student Enrollment propose zoning changes for the current middle school zones of P.S./I.S. 30 and J.H.S 259 William Mckinley. I.S. 30, a current middle school, was approved by the Panel for Educational Policy on May 23, 2012, to expand to serve grades K-8 at scale, starting in Fall 2013. As a K-8 school, aligning the elementary and middle school zones of P.S./I.S. 30 will allow families to be zoned to the same school throughout elementary and middle school.

The following are the proposed zone boundaries for schools in District 20 experiencing middle school zoning changes as a result of this proposal. All zone lines are to be drawn along the center of vehicular or transportation rights of way, unless specifically described otherwise.

 The addresses contained in the following area would be in the new P.S./I.S. 30 zone:

 - Begin at 3rd Avenue between Shore Road and 65th Street, then
 - East along 66th Street (including all street numbers) to 6th Avenue, then
 - South on 6th Avenue to Ovington Avenue, then
 - West on Ovington Avenue to 5th Avenue, then
 - South on 5th Avenue to 80th Street, then
 - West on 80th Street to 4th Avenue, then
 - North on 4th Avenue to 67th Street, then
 - West on 67th Street to 3rd Avenue, then
 - North on 3rd Avenue to between Shore Road and 65th Street (the point of origin).

 
The addresses contained in the following area would be in the new J.H.S. 259 zone:
 - Begin at southeast corner of 64th Street and 2nd Avenue, then
 - East on 64th Street (not including any street addresses) to Fort Hamilton Parkway, then
 - North on Fort Hamilton Parkway (including all street addresses from 64th Street to 62nd    
   Street) to 61st Street, then
 - East on 61st Street to 10th Avenue, then
 - South on 10th Avenue to 70th Street, then
 - East to 70th Street to 11th Avenue, then
 - South on 11th Avenue to 73rd Street, then
 - West on 73rd Street to 10th Avenue, then
 - South on 10th Avenue to 79th Street, then
 - West on 79th Street to 7th Avenue, then
 - South on 7th Avenue to 80th Street, then
 - West on 80th Street to 5th Avenue, then
 - North on 5th Avenue to Ovington Avenue, then
 - East on Ovington Avenue, then
 - North on 6th Avenue to between 66th and 65th Street, then
 - West along 66th Street (including all street addresses) to 3rd Avenue, then
 - South on 3rd Avenue to 67th Street, then
 - East on 67th Street to 4th Avenue, then
 - South on 4th Avenue to 80th Street, then
 - West on 80th Street to Narrows Avenue to the shoreline, then
 - North along the shoreline to 64th Street and 2nd Avenue (the point of origin).
                                            

Submitted on this date, the 5th day of November 2012 by:
Community Education Council District 20 Resolution passed unanimously.



Resolution District 20 Elementary Schools Rezoning Proposal 2nd REVISION  
Street Boundary Description for Impacted Schools Proposal Submitted October 10, 2012

The Office of Portfolio Management, the community Superintendent, and the Office of Student Enrollment propose zoning changes for the current elementary school zones of P.S. 170, P.S. 69, P.S.105, P.S. 127, and P.S. 176 in order to:

a. Create an elementary school zone for P.S./I.S. 30. I.S. 30, a current middle school, was approved by the Panel for Educational Policy (PEP) on May 23, 2012, to expand to serve grades K-8 at scale, starting in Fall 2013; and to

b. Leverage P.S./I.S. 30’s new elementary capacity to address growing demand and reduce waitlists and capping in other District 20 elementary schools.

The following are the proposed zone boundaries for schools in District 20 experiencing elementary school zoning changes as a result of this proposal. All zone lines are to be drawn along the center of vehicular or transportation rights of way, unless specifically described otherwise.

The addresses contained in the following area would be in the new P.S. 30 zone: 
-  Begin at 3rd Avenue between Shore Road and 65th Street, then 
 - East along 66 Street (including all street numbers) to 6th Avenue, then 
-  South on 6th Avenue to Ovington Avenue, then 
-  West on Ovington Avenue to 5th Avenue, then 
-  South on 5th Avenue to 80th Street, then 
-  West on 80th Street to 4th Avenue, then 
-  North on 4th Avenue to 67th Street, then 
-  West on 67th Street to 3rd Avenue, then 
-  North on 3rd Avenue to between Shore Road and 65th Street (the point of origin). 
      

The addresses contained in the following area would be in the new P.S. 170 zone:
 - Begin at southeast corner of 65th Street and 6th Avenue, then 
-  East on 65thStreet to 7th Avenue, then 
-  North on 7th Avenue to the LIRR rail yard, then 
-  East along the LIRR rail yard to 8th Avenue, then 
-  South on 8th Avenue (including all street numbers) to 64th Street, then 
-  East on 64th Street to 10th Avenue, then 
-  South on 10th Avenue to 73rd Street, then
-  West on 73rd Street to Fort Hamilton Parkway, then
-  South on Fort Hamilton Parkway (crossing under the Gowanus Expressway) to 7th Avenue, then 
-  South on 7th Avenue to 80th Street, then   
-  West on 80th Street to 5th Avenue, then
-  North on 5th Avenue to Ovington Avenue, then
-  East on Ovington Avenue to 6th Avenue, then 
-  North on 6th Avenue to 65th Street (the point of origin).
       

 The addresses contained in the following area would be in the new P.S. 69 zone:
 - Begin at southeast corner of 57th Street and 6th Avenue, then
- East on 57th Street to 7th Avenue, then
- South on 7th Avenue to 58th Street, then
- East on 58th Street to 8th Avenue, then
- South on 8th Avenue to 60th Street, then 
- East on 60th Street to 11th Avenue (not including street addresses on 60th Street between  
10th Avenue and 11th Avenue, then
- South on 11th Avenue to between 61st Street and 62nd Street, then
- West along the rail yards to 9th Avenue, then
- South on 9th Avenue to 63rd Street, then
- East on 63rd Street (including all street numbers) to 10th Avenue, then
- South on 10th Avenue to 64th Street, then
- West on 64th Street to 8th Avenue, then
- North on 8th Avenue (not including any street addresses) to just past 62nd Street, then
- West along the rail yards to 7th Avenue, then
- North on 7th Avenue to 60th Street, then
- West on 60th Street to 6th Avenue, then
- North on 6th Avenue (including all street numbers between 59th Street and 57th Street) to 57th
  Street (the point of origin).

The addresses contained in the following area would be in the new P.S. 105 zone:
- Begin at southeast corner of 55th Street and 6th Avenue, then
- East on 55th Street to 8th Avenue, then
- South on 8th Avenue to 56th Street, then
- East on 56th Street to 11th Avenue, then 
- South on 11th Avenue to 60th Street, then
- West on 60th Street (including all street numbers between 10th and 11th Avenue) to
   8th Avenue, then
- North on 8th Avenue to 58th Street, then
- West on 58th Street to 7th Avenue, then
- North on 7th Avenue to 57th Street, then
- West on 57th Street to 6th Avenue, then
- North on 6th Avenue to 55th Street (the point of origin).

 The addresses contained in the following area would be in the new P.S. 176 zone:
- Begin at northeast corner of 67th’Street and 12th Avenue, then
- North on 12th Avenue to 62nd Street, then
- East on 62nd Street to New Utrecht Avenue, then
- South on New Utrecht Avenue to 64th Street, then
- East on 64th Street to 15th Avenue, then
- South on 15th Avenue to Bay Ridge Avenue, then
- West on Bay Ridge Avenue (including all street numbers) to 14th Avenue, then
- South on 14th Avenue to Bay Ridge Parkway, then
- West on Bay Ridge Parkway to 13th Avenue, then
- South on 13th Avenue to 77th Street, then
- West on 77th Street to 12th Avenue, then
- North on 12th Avenue to 73rd Street, then
- West on 73rd Street to 10th Avenue, then
- North on 10th Avenue to 67th Street, then
- East on 67th Street (not including any street addresses) to 12th Avenue (the point of origin).

The addresses contained in the following area would be in the new P.S. 127 zone:
- Begin at southeast corner of 80th Street and 4th Avenue, then
- East on 80th Street to 7th Avenue, then
- North on 7th Avenue to Fort Hamilton Parkway, then
- East and northeast on Fort Hamilton Parkway to 73rd Street, then
- East on 73rd Street to 12th Avenue, then
- South on 12th Avenue to 86th Street, then
- West on 86th Street to Gatling Place, then
- North on Gatling Place to 84th Street, then
- West on 84th Street to 4th Avenue, then
- North on 4th Avenue to 80th Street (the point of origin).

 Submitted on this date, the 5th day of November 2012 by:

 Community Education Council District 20 Resolution passed unanimously.


Support of Proposed Change to NYS Education Law and Chancellor’s Regulations Regarding Eligibility of Parents of former English Language Learners (ELLs)  to serve on the Citywide and District Education Councils
Whereas, NYS Education Law (the law) 2590-B, 5. (a) (i) – (iii) established the Citywide Council on English Language Learners (CCELL), to be composed of nine voting members who shall be parents of students who are in a bilingual or English as a second language program to be eligible to serve; and
Whereas, NYS Education Law 2590-b6(a)(iii), the section on the Citywide Council on High Schools (CCHS); and  2590-c8.(c), the section on the 32 education council districts (CDECs) 2590-b6(a)(iii), both require one voting  member who shall be a parent of a student in a bilingual or English as a second language program to be eligible to serve on a citywide or district education council; and
Whereas,  the law also indicates that a parent of a child who is no longer an ELL does not meet the eligibility criteria and is no longer eligible to serve on a citywide or district education council; and
Whereas, by virtue of the parent population’s assumed limited English proficiency and limited understanding and knowledge of options available for parent participation, experience has shown that  the pool of eligible parents is limited; and 
Whereas, Power to the Parents Community and Citywide Education Councils 2011-2013 Election Results show that, out of 32 districts, parents of ELLs were only selected for Districts 4, 10, 17, 20 and 30; and
Whereas, according to a recent informal survey of district and citywide education councils only ten councils have seated a parent of an ELL student; and
Whereas, absent a change in State law, the Department of Education is unable to amend Chancellor’s Regulations to allow parents of former ELLs to run for seats on citywide or education councils; and now therefore be it
Resolved, that the Community Education Council District 20 fully supports a change in state law that will allow parents of ELLs and former ELLs to run for a seat on citywide and district education councils; and be it further
Resolved,  that the change in the law be accomplished in time to allow parents of ELLs and former ELLs to be eligible for the citywide and district education council elections scheduled for Spring of 2013; and be it further
Resolved, that only a small change in the law is sought, allowing parents of former ELLs to run for and serve on the citywide and district education councils.  
References: 
NYS Education Law 2590-B
Power to the Parents District Education and Citywide Councils 2011-2013 Election Results   

Passed Unanimously on October 10, 2012


In Support of Parents Boycott of Stand-Alone Field Tests
WHEREAS, our children have just spent six days in April taking New York State standardized tests in English and Math, which was nearly double the time compared to last year, and  
Whereas, this April’s exams included up to 30% field test questions, which were embedded to try out for future tests and do not count in children's scores; however, they make the tests substantially longer, so that most children spent up to nine hours testing and children with IEPs up to eighteen hours testing over the six day period, and
Whereas, Pearson Publishing and NYSED have not asked parents' permission to utilize our children as research subjects for Pearson’s financial benefit as a for-profit company, and
Wheareas, eighth grade students will be preparing for Regents exams in June and will be losing valuable instructional time to stand-alone field tests.
Therefore, be it resolved, that Community Education Council District 20 finds it unacceptable that even more valuable classroom time be allocated to the administering of test questions and 
Further resolved, that Community Education Council District 20 supports the parents' boycott of the field tests, as there are no negative consequences for our schools or our children if they do not take these stand-alone tests.
                   
               
Passed Unanimously on May 23, 2012

 

High Stakes, Standardized Testing of New York State Public School Students
WHEREAS, our nation's future well-being relies on a high-quality public education system that prepares all students for college, careers, citizenship and lifelong learning,
and strengthens the nation's social and economic well-being; and
WHEREAS, our nation's school systems have been spending growing amounts of time,money and energy on high-stakes standardized testing, in which student performance on 
standardized tests is used to   make major decisions affecting individual students, educators and schools; and
WHEREAS, the over-reliance on high-stakes standardized testing in state and federal accountability systems is undermining educational quality and equity in U.S. public
schools by hampering educators' efforts to focus on the broad range of learning  experiences that promote the innovation, creativity, problem solving, collaboration,
communication, critical thinking and deep subject-matter knowledge that will allow students to thrive in a democracy and an increasingly global society and economy; and
WHEREAS, it is widely recognized that standardized testing is an inadequate and  often unreliable measure of both student learning and educator effectiveness; and
WHEREAS, the over-emphasis on standardized testing has caused considerable collateral damage in too many schools, including narrowing the curriculum, teaching       
to  the test, reducing love of learning, pushing students out of school, driving excellent teachers out of the profession, and undermining school climate; and
WHEREAS, high-stakes standardized testing has negative effects for students from all backgrounds, and especially for low-income students, English language learners, 
children of color, and those with disabilities; and
WHEREAS, the culture and structure of the systems in which students learn must change in order to foster engaging school experiences that promote joy in learning, 
depth of thought and breadth of knowledge for students; therefore be it
RESOLVED, that Community Education Council District 20 calls on Governor Cuomo, the State legislature, Board of Regents, and the State Education Commissioner to 
reexamine public school accountability systems in this state, and to develop a system based on multiple forms of assessment which does not require extensive 
standardized testing, more accurately reflects the broad range of student learning, and is used to support students and improve schools; and
RESOLVED, that that Community Education Council District 20 urges the Governor and  the State Legislature to approve legislation giving parents the right to opt their 
children out of standardized testing, a right that parents have in many other states;
RESOLVED, that the Governor and the State Legislature approve legislation giving the public the right to examine the state standardized exams after they are given, as existed in NY state before this year and is still required by the “Truth in Testing” law that pertains to other standardized exams, such as the SATs; 
RESOLVED, that Community Education Council District 20 calls on the U.S. Congress and Administration to overhaul the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, currently known as the "No Child Left Behind Act," reduce the testing mandates, promote multiple forms of evidence of student learning and school quality in accountability, and not mandate any fixed role for the use of student test scores in evaluating educators.

Passed Unanimously on May 9, 2012

 

 

Amend School Governance Law To Allow Community District Education Councils Authority Over School Closings and Co-locations

Whereas , in a recent Quinnipiac poll, almost 60 percent of New Yorkers believe that that the mayor’s takeover of our schools has been a failure;   
Whereas, more than four times as many New Yorkers believe that in the future, the mayor should share power with an independent body than retain complete control over our schools.  (66% compared to 13%);  
Whereas,  public schools are the lifeblood of our communities, yet  Mayoral Control, as currently structured, has no checks and balances, but allows one person to determine the fate and future of every school and student in this City, irrespective of the views and input of all other stakeholders, including parents, students, teachers, and community members; 
Whereas, despite damaging effects on NYC students and overwhelming community opposition, the mayor has used his unilateral power to close over 100 public schools and proposes to close more than fifty additional schools this year.  
Whereas, the mayor has also pushed through many divisive co-locations which have created worse overcrowding and thereby severely undermined the quality of education our public school students receive, creating "separate and unequal" environments within their own schools and buildings. 
Whereas, Community District Education Councils are elected bodies of parents that, according to state law, have the authority to approve or disapprove alterations in school attendance lines.   
Whereas, since school closings and co-locations can radically affect enrollment, it is only logical that these bodies should have the authority to approve or disapprove school closings and/or co-locations.   
Be it resolved, that the Legislature should amend the school governance laws so that all proposals to close, phase, truncate or co-locate NYC public schools must be approved by the district Community Education Council in which the school resides.   
Be it resolved, that before taking a vote, the CEC shall solicit advice from the affected School Leadership Team(s), the district Presidents Council, the Chancellor’s Parent Advisory Council, and the Citywide Council on Special Education and other community organizations.  In the case of high schools, the district CEC shall also consider the advice of the Citywide Council on High Schools, in addition to the organizations listed above.  
Be it further resolved, that by these means, NYC public school parents and community members shall have a voice again as to the fate of our children’s public schools.  
Passed Unanimously on March 21, 2012

Contracts for Excellence Resolution 
Whereas, in the Campaign for Fiscal Equity case Judge Leland deGrasse concluded that NYC students were deprived of their constitutional right to an adequate education as a result of large class sizes;
Whereas, the Contracts for Excellence law passed in 2007 required NYC to reduce class size in all grades in return for receiving billions of dollars in additional state aid;
Whereas, smaller classes has been the top priority of parents on the DOE Learning Environment survey every year it has been given, and 86% of NYC principals say they are unable to provide a quality education because of excessive class size;
Whereas, in 2007, the DOE submitted a class size reduction plan calling for average class sizes of no more 20 in grades K-3; 23 in 4-8th and 25 in HS;
Whereas, DOE has received more than a billion dollars in total C4E funds since 2007; but class sizes have risen sharply in all grades since then:
Whereas,  this year, the final year of the city's 5-yr mandated reduction plan, class sizes are expected to be the largest in eleven years in the early grades;
Whereas, the state and the city scheduled C4E presentations this year after the funds had already been allocated, contrary to the intent of the law;
Whereas, there was a pre-approval process, in which DOE submitted its plan to the state education department before any public input had occurred, also contrary to the intent o f the law;
Whereas, the city has refused to hold borough hearings, as required by law, instead providing only brief and inadequate power point presentations before CECs, with insufficient public notice;
Whereas, the city and the state have a moral and legal obligation to provide the smaller classes that the state's highest court said was necessary for NYC children to receive their right to a sound basic education;
Be it resolved, that Community Education Council District 20 raises its voice in objection to the failure of the NYC DOE to comply with the Contracts for Excellence law, either in terms of the required public process or the results in class size; and
Be it resolved, that the City Council should hold annual hearings to review the NYC DOE's compliance with the Contracts for Excellence law and
Be it resolved, that the NY State Education Department should immediately require that DOE use all available funds to hire more teachers and reduce class sizes from now on, including the $504 million in C4E funds provided this year.

Submitted on this date, the 9th day of November 2011 by:
Community Education Council District 20 Resolution passed unanimously.


District 20 Middle School Rezoning Proposal Street Boundary Description for Impacted Schools Proposal Submitted May 12, 2010

The following are the proposed zone boundaries for schools in District 20 experiencing middle school zoning changes as a result of this proposal. All zone lines are to be drawn along the center of vehicular or transportation rights of way, unless specifically described otherwise.

1. The proposed zone for JHS 220

The area beginning at the intersection of 1st Avenue and 53rd Street, proceeding East on 53rd  Street to 6th Avenue, then:
- North on 6th Avenue, West on 47th Street
- North on 5th Avenue, East on 44th Street
- South on 7th Avenue, East on 47th Street
- North on 9th Avenue, East on 44th Street
- South on Fort Hamilton Parkway, East on 47th Street
- South on 12th Avenue, East on 48th Street
- South on 13th Avenue, West on 49th Street
- South on 12th Avenue, West on 50th Street
- South on 11th Avenue, West on 54th Street (both sides of street – even and odd residences)
- South on 8th Avenue, West on 59th Street
- North on 1st Avenue, proceeding to 53rd Street (point of origin),
 

will be the zone for JHS 220, located at 4812 9th Avenue.

 2. The proposed zone for JHS 223

The area beginning at the intersection of 8th Avenue and 55th Street, proceeding East on 55th Street (both sides of street – even and odd residences), then:
 - North on 11th Avenue, East on 50th Street
- North on 12th Avenue, East on 49th Street
- South on 13th Avenue, West 56th Street
- South on 12th Avenue, West on 59th Street
- North on 8th Avenue, proceeding to 55th Street (point of origin);

will be zoned to JHS 223, located at 4200 16th Avenue.

 
Also, the area beginning at the intersection of 9th Avenue and 47th Street, proceeding West on 47th Street then:
- North on 7th Avenue, East on 41st  Street
- North on 8th  Avenue, East on 38th Street - Northeast on Fort Hamilton Parkway
- South on East 3rd Street, East on 18th Avenue
- South on Ocean Parkway, East along the LIRR Bay Ridge Line
- North on East 3rd Street, East on Foster Avenue
- North on Seton Place, Continuing North on East 2nd Street (both sides of street)
- North on McDonald Avenue, West on Ditmas Avenue
- North on Dahill Road, Southwest on 16th Avenue
- West on 46th Street, South on 15th Avenue
- West on 48th Street (both sides of street), North on 12th Avenue
- West on 47th Street, North on Fort Hamilton Parkway
- West on 44th Street, South on 9th Avenue to 47th Street (point of origin)


will be zoned to JHS 223, located at 4200 16th Avenue.  

Also, the area beginning at the intersection of 20th Avenue and 54th Street, proceeding West on 54th Street then:

- North on 18th Avenue, East on 52nd Street

- South on 20th Avenue, to 54th Street (point of origin)

 

will be zoned to JHS 223, located at 4200 16th Avenue.

 3. The proposed zone for JHS 259

The area beginning at the intersection of 4th Avenue and 80th Street proceeding West on 80th Street, then:  
- North on Belt Parkway (both sides of street), East on 72nd Street
- South on 4th Avenue (both sides of street), East on 73rd Street
 - North on 6th Avenue (both sides of street), West on 68th Street (both sides of street)
- North on 5th Avenue (both sides of street), West on Bay Ridge Avenue
- North on Belt Parkway (both sides of street), West on 64th Street
 - North on Fort Hamilton Parkway (both sides of street) to East on 60th Street - South on 10th Avenue, East on 70th Street
- South on 11th Avenue, West on 73rd Street
- South on 10th Avenue, West on 79th Street
 - South on 7th Avenue, West on 80th Street to 4th Avenue (point of origin)

 will be zoned to JHS 259, located at 7301 Fort Hamilton Parkway.

 4. The proposed zone for JHS 201

The area beginning at the intersection of 3rd Avenue and 92nd Street proceeding West on 92nd Street, then:
- North on Belt Parkway (both sides of street), East on 80th Street
- North on 7th Avenue, East on 79th Street
- North on 10th Avenue, East on 73rd Street
- North on 11th Avenue, East on 70th Street
- South on 14th Avenue, East on 75th Street
- South on 15th Avenue, East on 80th Street - South on 18th Avenue, West on 86th Street
- North on 7th Avenue, West on 84th Street
 - South on 4th Avenue, West on 89th Street
- South on 3rd Avenue, West on 92nd Street (point of origin)  

will be zoned to JHS 201, located at 8010 12th Avenue

 5. The proposed middle school zone for PS/IS 229

 (identical to the existing ES zone):

The area beginning at the intersection of 14th Avenue and 86th Street proceeding East on 86th Street, then:

- South on Bay 13 Street, West on Benson Avenue

- South on 16th Avenue, East on Cropsey Avenue

 - South on Bay 13 Street, West on Belt Parkway (both sides of street)

 - North on Bay 8 Street, West on Cropsey Avenue - North on 14th Avenue to 86th Street (point of origin)  

 

will be the middle school zone for PS/IS 229, located at 1400 Benson Avenue   

 

6. The proposed middle school zone for PS/IS 163

(identical to the existing ES zone):

The area beginning at the intersection of Bay 13 Street and 86th Street, proceeding East on 86th Street, then:

 - South on 19th Avenue, West on Benson Avenue

 - South on Bay 19 Street, East on Cropsey Avenue

- South on Bay 20 Street, West on Belt Parkway (both sides of street)

- North on Bay 13 Street, West on Cropsey Avenue

- North on 16 Avenue, East on Benson Avenue

- North on Bay 13 Street to 86th Street (point of origin)  

Will be the middle school zone for PS/IS 163 located at 1664 Benson Avenue

 Submitted on this date, the 9th day of June 2010 by:

Community Education Council District 20 Resolution passed unanimously.


RESOLUTION TO REVISE CHANCELLOR’S REGULATIONS A-812

Whereas, the Community Education Council District 20 of Brooklyn, NY on behalf of the elementary and junior high schools object to the updated revision to Chancellor’s Regulations A—8 12 dated June 29. 2009. The regulation had been updated with new provisions to limit sales of snack items by PA/PTA fundraising. 

Whereas, the ban comes at a tough time for schools who are dealing with severe budget cuts to fund after-school programs and supplies. Snack and Bake Sales ha\’e proven to be highly profitable for PA/PTA’s, as the start-up costs are minimal. These revenues provide programs, activities, and supplies to students where the Department of Education cannot provide, due to these budget constraints.

Whereas, snack sales and bake sales help build a community. Parents are involved in the selling and preparing of the items, students learn how to manage money and work together with fellow students.

Whereas, that banning snack sales is not an effective solution to the problem of obesity. There are better ways to improve student health at school including more physical activity/gym time, making more, fresh, healthy foods available in the cafeteria, and teaching nutrition in schools. 

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that the Chancellor must review and revise regulation A-812 dated June 29, 2009 to permit PA/PTA’s snack sales and to hold bake sales without time restrictions, during lunch. PA/PTAs will continue to assure that students are only served snacks when they have finished their lunch.

Submitted on this date. the 18 th day of November 2009 by:

Community Education Council District 20

and the following District 20 Schools:

IS30,PS48,IS62,PS69,PS102,PS/IS104, PS105, PS112, PS127,

PS160, PS163,PS164, PS170, PS176, PS179, PS/IS180, PS185,

PS186, IS187, PS/IS192, PS200, IS201, PS204, PS205, IS220,

IS223, IS227, PS/IS229, PS247, IS259, PS503, PS506, PS682

Voted on and approved on November 18, 2009 



Resolution Opposing the Installation of Cellular Phone Towers, Antennae or Related Devices Near Schools
Whereas, we, the Community Education Council, have been chosen to be advocates of the parents and children of District 20 schools;
Whereas, the parents of District 20 have made it clearly known to us they oppose the installation of cellular phone towers, antennae or other related devices in close approximation of schools;
Whereas, the long term health effects of cellular phone towers, antennae or other related devices, has yet to be determined; Whereas, a standardized, uniform policy for health and safety protection is not in place as of yet;
Now therefore Be It Resolved that the Community Education Council of District 20, on behalf of the parents and children of District 20, hereby requests the city administration and city council to revise its regulations by restricting cellular phone towers, antennae or other related devices to be installed within 500 feet of a school.

Voted And Approved February 13, 2008 

Resolution Opposing Budgets Cuts Mid-Year

Whereas, we, the Community Education Council, have been chosen to be advocates of the parents and children of District 20 schools;

Whereas, budgets for each school have been established and funds have been earmarked for the education and betterment of our children through specific programs by their respective School Leadership Teams;

Whereas, we, the Community Education Council of District 20, understands the need for city wide budget cuts;

Now therefore be it Resolved; that the Community Education Council of District 20, on behalf of the parents and children of District 20, hereby requests the city administration and Department of Education to revise and amend its policy of mid-year budget cuts.

Voted and Approved February 13, 2008

 

Resolution Demanding that the Mayor, the Governor and the State Legislature Keep Their Promises To Our Children
Whereas, the Governor and the State Legislature promised a $528 million increase to New York State’s basic operating aid called “foundation aid”) for 2008-09, but the proposed to New York City  (also Executive Budget cuts this amount to $335 million; and 
Whereas, the Mayor committed to raise New York City’s investment in our children’s education by $2.2 billion over four years, but is taking back $180 million this year with $100 million coming right out of the classrooms and cutting an additional $324 million next year, for a two year total of more than one-half billion dollars; and
Whereas, New York State committed to increase building funds for New York City by $11.2 billion to allow the City to complete its $13.1 billion capital plan to construct and repair schools, but now this promise is threatened by proposed reforms that would delay the state reimbursement to the City for school construction costs; and 
Whereas, the State Legislature, the Governor, the City Council and the Mayor must Keep the Promises to our school children;  
THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED THAT, we demand that the Governor and State Legislature KEEP THE PROMISE and restore the missing $193 million in foundation aid.  These funds are supposed to be tied to the Contract for Excellence which is the only real accountability mechanism we have to ensure that funds go to reduce class size, reform middle schools and high schools, provide for the needs of English Language Learners and achieve other fundamental school reforms; and   BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED THAT, we demand that the Mayor and the City Council KEEP THE PROMISE by restoring the half billion dollars in cuts for this year and next; and BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED THAT, we demand that the Governor and State Legislature KEEP THE PROMISE to increase building funds by $11.2 billion to allow the City to construct and repair school buildings at a pace that will matter for our students in the future. 


Voted and Approved March 11, 2008